Max Makes A Million

Hertz Stage
Recommended for all audiences
World Premiere

Based on the book by Maira Kalman
Adapted and Directed by Liz Diamond

Poetry, dance, jazz, visual art, and most of all, dreams coalesce in a glorious theatrical adaptation of Maira Kalman’s one-of-a-kind book Max Makes A Million. Adapted and directed by celebrated theatre artist Liz Diamond, this play follows the beat-poet dog Max Stravinsky on his quest to get to Paris and celebrates those wishful thinkers who dare to dream beyond what seems possible. Max Makes a Million is produced in collaboration with the High Museum of Art’s exhibition, The Pursuit of Everything: Maira Kalman’s Books for Children, a colorful exhibition exploring the extensive catalog of Kalman’s imaginative stories and illustrations, which have delighted readers for more than 30 years. 
 

Hertz Stage

Hertz Stage view during The Whipping Man

The Alliance Theatre's Hertz Stage is a modern, 200-seat Black Box theatre. This versatile facility accommodates a number of distinct stage layouts.

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Woodruff Arts Center

1280 Peachtree Street NE, Atlanta, GA 30309

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Creative

Born in 1949 in Tel Aviv, Israel, Kalman moved to Riverdale in New York’s Bronx borough with her family at age 4. Now a Manhattan resident, Kalman has written and illustrated 18 children’s books, including “Ooh-la-la-Max in Love,” “What Pete Ate,” “Fireboat: The Heroic Adventures of the John J. Harvey,” “13 WORDS,” a collaboration with Lemony Snicket, “Why We Broke Up,” with Daniel Handler, “Looking at Lincoln” and “Thomas Jefferson Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Everything.”

She is a frequent contributor to The New Yorker magazine, and is well known for her collaboration with Rick Meyerowitz on the “New Yorkistan” cover in 2001. Additional projects include illustrating Strunk and White’s classic “The Elements of Style.” Kalman also created two monthly online columns for The New York Times. The first, “The Principles of Uncertainty” (2006-07), was a narrative journal of her life. The second, “And The Pursuit of Happiness” (2009), was a yearlong exploration of American history and democracy. Both columns are now collected in book form, published by the Penguin Press.

Kalman has had eight exhibitions at the Julie Saul Gallery since 2003. In 2010, The Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia, organized a retrospective of Kalman’s work entitled “Maira Kalman: Various Illuminations (of a Crazy World),” which traveled to the Contemporary Jewish Museum (San Francisco, CA), the Skirball Cultural Center (Los Angeles, CA), and the Jewish Museum in NYC. Her work has appeared in books published by the Museum of Modern Art and the Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum, in connection with 2014 exhibition “Maira Kalman: My Favorite Things.” Her longstanding contributions to literature, art and design awarded her with the opportunity to serve as a resident at the American Academy in Rome and to present two renowned TED talks in 2007 and 2014. 

Maira Kalman
Maira Kalman
Author

Born in 1949 in Tel Aviv, Israel, Kalman moved to Riverdale in New York’s Bronx borough with her family at age 4. Now a Manhattan resident, Kalman has written and illustrated 18 children’s books, including “Ooh-la-la-Max in Love,” “What Pete Ate,” “Fireboat: The Heroic Adventures of the John J. Harvey,” “13 WORDS,” a collaboration with Lemony Snicket, “Why We Broke Up,” with Daniel Handler, “Looking at Lincoln” and “Thomas Jefferson Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Everything.”

She is a frequent contributor to The New Yorker magazine, and is well known for her collaboration with Rick Meyerowitz on the “New Yorkistan” cover in 2001. Additional projects include illustrating Strunk and White’s classic “The Elements of Style.” Kalman also created two monthly online columns for The New York Times. The first, “The Principles of Uncertainty” (2006-07), was a narrative journal of her life. The second, “And The Pursuit of Happiness” (2009), was a yearlong exploration of American history and democracy. Both columns are now collected in book form, published by the Penguin Press.

Kalman has had eight exhibitions at the Julie Saul Gallery since 2003. In 2010, The Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia, organized a retrospective of Kalman’s work entitled “Maira Kalman: Various Illuminations (of a Crazy World),” which traveled to the Contemporary Jewish Museum (San Francisco, CA), the Skirball Cultural Center (Los Angeles, CA), and the Jewish Museum in NYC. Her work has appeared in books published by the Museum of Modern Art and the Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum, in connection with 2014 exhibition “Maira Kalman: My Favorite Things.” Her longstanding contributions to literature, art and design awarded her with the opportunity to serve as a resident at the American Academy in Rome and to present two renowned TED talks in 2007 and 2014. 

Director

Liz Diamond has taught at Yale School of Drama and served as a Resident Director of Yale Repertory Theatre since 1992. She has served as the Chair of the Directing department since 2004. Among the more than 50 productions she has directed at Yale Rep and nationally are many US and world premieres, including Jordan Harrison’s Futura, Catherine Treischman’s Crooked, Lucinda Coxon’s Happy Now?, Octavio Solis’ Gibraltar, Marcus Gardley’s Dance of the Holy Ghosts, and Suzan-Lori Parks’ The America PlayThe Death of the Last Black Man in the Whole Entire WorldBetting on the Dust Commander, and Imperceptible Mutabilities in the Third Kingdom. Productions of classical and modern works include Stravinsky’s The Soldier’s Tale, which she also translated, Blaise Candrar’s La Prose du Transsibérien, Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale, Shaw’s Mrs. Warren’s Profession, and Pinter’s Betrayal. She has also directed major new translations of Racine’s Phedre, Molière’s School for Wives, Brecht’s St Joan of the Stockyards, and Strindberg’s Miss Julie. Ms. Diamond has directed documentary theater projects in collaboration with Anna Deavere Smith at the Institute for the Arts and Civic Dialogue at Harvard University, the Yale School of Medicine, and the Lincoln Center Institute. She has been awarded the OBIE and the Connecticut Critics Circle Award for Outstanding Direction. She has taught directing at La MaMa Umbria, the Hong Kong Academy of Performing Arts, and the Shanghai Theatre Academy, where she is a Visiting Professor. After completing her M.F.A. at Columbia University in 1983, Ms. Diamond worked as a freelance director and served as the Resident Director at New Dramatists in New York. In 1978, while serving as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, Ms. Diamond cofounded the Projet de Théâtre Rurale Voltaïque, which grew into the Atelier de Théâtre Burkinabe and still thrives today.

Liz Diamond
Liz Diamond
Adapter & Director

Liz Diamond has taught at Yale School of Drama and served as a Resident Director of Yale Repertory Theatre since 1992. She has served as the Chair of the Directing department since 2004. Among the more than 50 productions she has directed at Yale Rep and nationally are many US and world premieres, including Jordan Harrison’s Futura, Catherine Treischman’s Crooked, Lucinda Coxon’s Happy Now?, Octavio Solis’ Gibraltar, Marcus Gardley’s Dance of the Holy Ghosts, and Suzan-Lori Parks’ The America PlayThe Death of the Last Black Man in the Whole Entire WorldBetting on the Dust Commander, and Imperceptible Mutabilities in the Third Kingdom. Productions of classical and modern works include Stravinsky’s The Soldier’s Tale, which she also translated, Blaise Candrar’s La Prose du Transsibérien, Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale, Shaw’s Mrs. Warren’s Profession, and Pinter’s Betrayal. She has also directed major new translations of Racine’s Phedre, Molière’s School for Wives, Brecht’s St Joan of the Stockyards, and Strindberg’s Miss Julie. Ms. Diamond has directed documentary theater projects in collaboration with Anna Deavere Smith at the Institute for the Arts and Civic Dialogue at Harvard University, the Yale School of Medicine, and the Lincoln Center Institute. She has been awarded the OBIE and the Connecticut Critics Circle Award for Outstanding Direction. She has taught directing at La MaMa Umbria, the Hong Kong Academy of Performing Arts, and the Shanghai Theatre Academy, where she is a Visiting Professor. After completing her M.F.A. at Columbia University in 1983, Ms. Diamond worked as a freelance director and served as the Resident Director at New Dramatists in New York. In 1978, while serving as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, Ms. Diamond cofounded the Projet de Théâtre Rurale Voltaïque, which grew into the Atelier de Théâtre Burkinabe and still thrives today.

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